Network in Defense of Humanity Repudiates the Invocation of TIAR

Through a communiqué, the Network in Defense of Humanity expressed its “categorical repudiation” of the invocation, by a group of countries, of the Inter-American Treaty of Reciprocal Assistance (TIAR) against Venezuela by the Permanent Council of the OAS, considering it “an obsolete and nefarious instrument that historically has sought to legitimize military interventions by the United States”.

On September 11, the Permanent Council of the Organization of American States (OAS), of which Venezuela is no longer a member, approved the activation of TIAR, which contemplates “the use of armed force” for an eventual intervention in Venezuela.

The proposal was introduced by the supposed Venezuelan representative (Gustavo Tarre Briceño appointed by the deputy in contempt, Juan Guaidó, who is not recognized by the legitimate Venezuelan government of President Nicolás Maduro) and was approved with 12 votes in favour, 5 abstentions and 2 absentees. The 12 countries that supported TIAR – out of a total of 19 signatories – were: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Paraguay, United States and Venezuela. Five countries abstained: Costa Rica, Panama, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago and Uruguay; Bahamas and Cuba were absent.

The following is the communiqué from the Network in Defense of Humanity:

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Network in Defense of Humanity: Repudiation of the invocation of TIAR

The Network in Defense of Humanity expresses its categorical repudiation of the invocation of the Inter-American Treaty of Reciprocal Assistance (TIAR) against the Venezuelan people and denounces with concern that a group of countries, aligned with the interests of the United States, decided in a session of the Permanent Council of the OAS to activate this obsolete and nefarious instrument that has historically sought to legitimize military interventions by the United States against the peoples of Latin America and the Caribbean.

The Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, together with other countries of the Region – previously Cuba and Mexico had done so – disassociated themselves on 14 May 2013 from this infamous instrument of colonization in underlying aggression and war. On the contrary, on January 29, 2014, within the framework of the II CELAC Summit held in Havana, the Heads of State and Government, aware that the war in one of the countries of the Region endangers the peace of the Continent and slows down the advance of the union of Our America, proclaimed Latin America and the Caribbean a zone of peace.

The Network in Defense of Humanity demands respect for international law based on the principles of sovereignty and self-determination of peoples. It also reiterates the call for dialogue as an instrument to deal with differences and controversies among States and to guarantee the coexistence and friendship of peoples.

At a time when imperialism is once again turning to the issue of war, the Network in Defense of Humanity calls on the peoples of the world to raise their voices for the ideals of peace and calls on intellectuals, artists and social movements to participate in the world day of solidarity with the Venezuelan people, to be held on Saturday, September 21, the International Day of Peace.

Network in Defense of Humanity, September 13, 2019


What is TIAR?

The Inter-American Treaty of Reciprocal Assistance (TIAR) was signed by a group of countries of the American continent on September 2, 1947, after the Second World War, during the beginning of the “Cold War”. It was created to respond to alleged threats from the Soviet Union and the People’s Republic of China against the United States and its allies at the time, and states that the signatory countries “agree that an armed attack by any State against an American State shall be considered an attack against all American States, and consequently, each of the said Contracting Parties undertakes to assist in confronting the attack”.

It is, in other words, an equivalent to NATO in that any attack on any country on the American continent by the Soviet Union or China would be considered by the United States and its allies to be an attack on themselves and an excuse to respond militarily.

TIAR is being invoked in 2019 with the argument that in Venezuela there is supposedly an “illegitimate government” and that it has the military support of Russia, which is seen by the United States and its allies as an “aggression” and an “attack” that would require a response.

For that reason, TIAR is seen as a way of legalizing a U.S.-led military occupation against Venezuela.

Venezuela withdrew from TIAR six years ago, considering it a “dead letter since the United States contradicted it in practice in the 1980s,” in reference to the Falklands War, in which that country allied itself with England against Argentina. However, Congressman Juan Guaidó, who proclaimed himself in January as the supposed “interim president” of Venezuela with the support of the United States, asked the National Assembly to reincorporate the country into TIAR last July in order to legitimize an eventual military intervention.

Alba Cuidad

Translation by Internationalist 360°