‘Arab Spring’, Globalization And The Defragmentation Of The Arab World

‘The Arab spring’ is not a threat for all oil rich countries

News.Az
Edited by Rick Rozoff

Globalization itself had a major role in fueling the Arab Spring. Media coverage, social networks, and Wikileaks contributed massively to spread the “anger” around “the country” or “the region”.

History has taught us to regret division no matter how bitter the reasons might be. We all recall the Arab revolts back in 1916, and how the Brits did so well in dividing such a great empire under the name of the fight against corruption and the advocacy for human and political rights!

The problem with Kaddafi was that he refused to follow the rules. He worked for a united continent fed by local production far away from the rules of globalization and capitalism. I think this was the major “mistake” that cost him his life and the quasi-destruction of his country.

News.Az interviews Nadia Logab, an affiliate expert with the European Geopolitical Forum.

Were the reasons for the “Arab Spring” events the same, is there any linkage between them or must each of these cases be analyzed separately?

I believe there are both common and specific reasons that triggered the so-called Arab Spring in the region. As you certainly know, wherever there is a society in a transitional development process, the people will have high expectations for development that cannot necessarily be met by their governments.

This creates a sort of conflict and even mistrust between the people and the government, and thereby leads to a revolution, in most of the cases. Even worse, political corruption and a slow economic pace in certain Arab countries made it even harder for the people’s expectations to be met. In addition to that, none can deny the role of the international “pressure” that was exercised on the region in terms of globalization and adherence to international institutions.

Globalization itself had a major role in fueling the Arab Spring. Media coverage, social networks, and Wikileaks contributed massively to spread the “anger” around “the country” or “the region”. Also, we live in a world where the young people are dreaming the “American dream” yet living a “bitter” reality. So, they are not the only ones to be blamed. This also leads me to mention the demographic composition of the countries in question; too many young people with nothing to do cannot fail to use their unused energy in uprisings and even revolts.

Some people in the West call this events a “victory of democracy”, but it isn’t so, as we can see in the Libyan and other examples. Which countries’ experience of the “Arab Spring” was most successful amongst the Northern Africa and the Middle East states?

The “victory of democracy” can be accurate to a certain extent for the Tunisian model. We still have to give Egypt more time to get a clearer view, even though I am not very optimistic, and I hate to say it. Libya is a sad story, so far. I hope the best is coming for in regards to the great potential of Libya, but I do not see a big difference before and after NATO intervention in terms of “democracy”, for instance. Both parties were bombing unarmed civilians, then why call this democracy? I wonder.

What do you think about the idea of dividing Libya into two parts?

The idea in the Arab world is that “unity is equal to strength”. Any kind of division is perceived as negative. History has taught us to regret division no matter how bitter the reasons might be. We all recall the Arab revolts back in 1916, and how the Brits did so well in dividing such a great empire under the name of the fight against corruption and the advocacy for human and political rights!

Is it a warning that oil countries in other parts of the world should be afraid of the “Libyan scenario” if the US decides to implement it?

I do not see it as a threat for all oil-rich countries. It is hard to predict a revolution in the KSA [Kingdom of Saudi Arabia], for instance. I think the problem with Kaddafi was that he refused to follow the rules. He worked for a united continent fed by local production far away from the rules of globalization and capitalism. I think this was the major “mistake” that cost him his life and the quasi-destruction of his country.

Nadia Logab is a public policy analyst. She is currently part of a regional policy lab created in partnership with the British Council and Chatham House. Professionally, she is working with the UNDP office of Algiers on the project of Financial Market Reforms. Nadia is also an activist. She is coordinating a project to empower Algerian youth in order for them to get involved in the decision making process and participate more in the political life of the country.

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